Should you file for disability or workers’ compensation?

| Mar 8, 2021 | Workers' Compensation |

You hurt yourself recently, and because your employer may not know whether your injury qualifies for workers’ compensation, you want to explore other options for recovering and protecting your income. Have you considered filing a disability insurance claim?

Chron explores the two coverage types for injured employees. Learn how workers’ comp and disability differ and how they overlap.

Where the two diverge

The biggest difference between disability insurance and workers’ comp is the latter only covers illnesses and injuries sustained on the clock while the former applies to harm that prevents a person from making a living. Only employers pay for workers’ comp coverage, not employees. If your company offers an employer-sponsored disability benefits plan, you pay your premiums.

Did a physician inform you that your medical condition qualifies as a disability rather than a temporary injury? If so, you may have little choice but to tap into your disability insurance policy.

Where the two intersect

You receive financial compensation no matter if you qualify for disability or workers’ comp. Both forms of coverage differ according to one’s geographic location and job title. If an investigation reveals you intentionally harmed yourself or caused your own injuries, you no longer qualify for disability or workers’ comp.

Where the two hit their limits

No matter if you file a workers’ comp or disability claim, you do not receive your full salary as monetary payment while you recover. If you work in a business sector that puts you at risk of longstanding illness or injury, you may have higher disability insurance premiums.

Your employer or another workers’ comp professional may help you determine which route to take. Either way, take steps to protect your health and your income.